Archive for the Emory Douglas Art Category

Emory Douglas, MALCOLM X canvas print (Limited 13 pcs)

Posted in Emory Douglas Art on August 14, 2011 by Listen Recovery

“Malcolm X”
Printed by Political Gridlock at Firehouse Kustom Rockart Co.
(c) 2009 Emory Douglas/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
6 color screenprint
Printed on canvas
Dimensions: 18” x 18” (45.72 x 45.72cm)
Each canvas is incomparable and varies in appearance and detail
Signed and numbered by the artist
Edition of 13

purchase here <

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EMORY DOUGLAS: HIS ART. brief review (bio and links by Wikipedia)

Posted in arte universal / universal art, Black Panthers, Emory Douglas Art, Revolutionary/Revolucionario on November 22, 2009 by Listen Recovery

 

AMAZON: EMORY DOUGLAS Art Book Link

http://www.moca-la.org/emorydouglas/bp_about.php

Emory Douglas worked as the Minister of Culture for the Black Panther Party from 1967 until the Party disbanded in the 1980s. His graphic art was featured in most issues of the newspaper The Black Panther (which had a peak circulation of 139,000 per week in 1970)[1] and has become an iconic representation of the struggles of the Party during the 1960s and 70s. The San Francisco Chronicle reported that Douglas “branded the militant-chic Panther image decades before the concept became commonplace. He used the newspaper’s popularity to incite the disenfranchised to action, portraying the poor with genuine empathy, not as victims but as outraged, unapologetic and ready for a fight.”[2]

As a teenager, Douglas was incarcerated at the Youth Training School in Ontario, California; during his time there he worked in the prison’s printing shop. He later studied commercial art at San Francisco City College.

Colette Gaiter writes:

Douglas was the most prolific and persistent graphic agitator in the American Black Power movements. Douglas profoundly understood the power of images in communicating ideas…. Inexpensive printing technologies—including photostats and presstype, textures and patterns—made publishing a two-color heavily illustrated, weekly tabloid newspaper possible. Graphic production values associated with seductive advertising and waste in a decadent society became weapons of the revolution. Technically, Douglas collaged and re-collaged drawings and photographs, performing graphic tricks with little budget and even less time. His distinctive illustration style featured thick black outlines (easier to trap) and resourceful tint and texture combinations. Conceptually, Douglas’s images served two purposes: first, illustrating conditions that made revolution seem necessary; and second, constructing a visual mythology of power for people who felt powerless and victimized. Most popular media represents middle to upper class people as “normal.” Douglas was the Norman Rockwell of the ghetto, concentrating on the poor and oppressed. Departing from the WPA/social realist style of portraying poor people, which can be perceived as voyeuristic and patronizing, Douglas’s energetic drawings showed respect and affection. He maintained poor people’s dignity while graphically illustrating harsh situations.